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Lent Retreat: 2018

from the ISC: Glasgow
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 Scripture for Prayer

Day 33 - 5th Sunday of Lent

Stilling: Take a few minutes to become still.

God is Present: God is with you. Ask God to inspire your imagination.

Ask for what you desire. What gift, what grace do you want right now?

Read the passage through.

Identify with a character: Choose one of the people in the story and imagine the scene from their point of view.

Set the Scene: Fill in the details which the scripture leaves out to make the story real for you. Imagine the scenery, the weather, the people. Be aware of how you feel.

Luke 10:1-12 (NRSVA)

After this the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him in pairs to every town and place where he himself intended to go.

He said to them, ‘The harvest is plentiful, but the labourers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out labourers into his harvest. Go on your way. See, I am sending you out like lambs into the midst of wolves. Carry no purse, no bag, no sandals; and greet no one on the road. Whatever house you enter, first say, “Peace to this house!” And if anyone is there who shares in peace, your peace will rest on that person; but if not, it will return to you. Remain in the same house, eating and drinking whatever they provide, for the labourer deserves to be paid. Do not move about from house to house. Whenever you enter a town and its people welcome you, eat what is set before you;  cure the sick who are there, and say to them, “The kingdom of God has come near to you.”

But whenever you enter a town and they do not welcome you, go out into its streets and say,  “Even the dust of your town that clings to our feet, we wipe off in protest against you. Yet know this: the kingdom of God has come near.” I tell you, on that day it will be more tolerable for Sodom than for that town.

Conversation: When you come towards the end of your time of prayer, talk to Jesus about what has come up for you.
Imagine how he might reply.

A Prayer: End with a formal prayer, such as the Lord's Prayer/Our Father

 Today's Meditation

We are all Evangelisers

120. In virtue of their baptism, all the members of the People of God have become missionary disciples (cf. Mt 28:19).
All the baptised, whatever their position in the Church or their level of instruction in the faith, are agents of evangelisation, and it would be insufficient to envisage a plan of evangelisation to be carried out by professionals while the rest of the faithful would simply be passive recipients.
The new evangelisation calls for personal involvement on the part of each of the baptised.
Every Christian is challenged, here and now, to be actively engaged in evangelisation; indeed, anyone who has truly experienced God’s saving love does not need much time or lengthy training to go out and proclaim that love.
Every Christian is a missionary to the extent that he or she has encountered the love of God in Christ Jesus: we no longer say that we are “disciples” and “missionaries”, but rather that we are always “missionary disciples”.
If we are not convinced, let us look at those first disciples, who, immediately after encountering the gaze of Jesus, went forth to proclaim him joyfully: “We have found the Messiah!” (Jn 1:41).
The Samaritan woman became a missionary immediately after speaking with Jesus and many Samaritans come to believe in him “because of the woman’s testimony” (Jn 4:39).
So too, Saint Paul, after his encounter with Jesus Christ, “immediately proclaimed Jesus” (Acts 9:20; cf. 22:6-21).
So what are we waiting for?

121. Of course, all of us are called to mature in our work as evangelisers. We want to have better training, a deepening love and a clearer witness to the Gospel. In this sense, we ought to let others be constantly evangelising us.
But this does not mean that we should postpone the evangelising mission; rather, each of us should find ways to communicate Jesus wherever we are.

Pope Francis; Evangelii Gaudium

 Review of Prayer


 Suggestions for Prayer

Take time to pray with today's scripture you could use imaginative contemplation
You might also use Lectio Divina to meditate on the letter of Pope Francis on Evangelisation.

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